Car PC Worklog Update

I decided I’d probably just post incremental updates instead of long “post-mortem” work logs after everything’s done. I’m pretty bad about documenting the process as I go, so this might work, it might not…

For any CarPC, there are a few main subsystems:

  1. LCD/Monitor and bezel (molding)
  2. Core Computer Hardware
  3. Peripherals (sound cards, cams, GPS, etc)
  4. Audio (including car speakers, amps, etc)

This post is largely about the Monitor assembly (specific to my car). Back when I started researching Car PCs (>5 years ago), there weren’t many good commercial(ish) products dedicated to mobile computing (“Infotainment”). That’s all changed, though. I determined that the best use of my time would be investing in a Bybyte Double-Din LCD frame specifically designed for the Monitor I was using (Lilliput 669GL w/ HDMI). After receiving the unit, I quickly found out (by an eyeballed test fit) that my head unit was actually larger than a standard DoubleDin. I ended up buying a Metra dash-kit for my Golf, and assembled it (with some support by the wonderful folks of the Bybyte team). Some assembly notes follow:

I bought a DIY/disassembled Double-DIN kit on ebay via mo-co-so. After my first one came in with some imperfections/blemishes, mocoso support shipped me a new one free of charge. EXCELLENT customer service, I would not hesitate to recommend them to anyone looking for CarPC accessories. This photo shows my impromptu binder clip “clamps” while assembling the mounting tabs.

The disassembled Lilliput HB 669GL HDMI and assembled frame.

Assembly process, routing cables. Hiding the panel control buttons. Well designed kit by Bybyte, no risk of dangling cables that will eventually get broken off. Only slight here is that there is no physical access to the buttons. This isn’t really important as there’s a remote, but to enable “auto on” functionality upon powerup, you need access to the buttons at least once.

Assembled kit.

This is a shot demonstrating how the Metra dash trim kit fits over the Bybyte DoubleDIN enclosure.

 

How the kit looks when it is actually lined up. The step between the Bybyte and Metra is pretty ugly, but I’m not going to invest any time (at the moment) to clean it up and/or custom fab a better solution. Maybe if it bothers me in the future.

Splitting the enclosures up

This photo shows the modification required to get the Bybyte DDIN kit to fit with the Metra trim kit. Just cut off the bottom shelf.

This shows the one major issue I had during assembly. The DDIN kit mounting holes do NOT line up with the Metra dash kit when they’re centered. I recommend removing the bottom shelf, inserting the LCD frame, and THEN mounting and gluing the mounting arms. They will NOT be centered. I ended up removing some material with a dremel to get the mounting screws to go in.

A quick test fit of my NUC behind the mounted display. My initial thought is to remove the NUC from the enclosure and build a fan system for it as well as the PSU.

Showing the minimal clearance.

That’s it for now. Stay tuned for the next phase, which is cabling my car. Fabrication for PC/Audio/PSU mounting will probably come shortly after that. Once that’s through, it’ll be the test run/test fit.

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